Tag Archive | Martin Luther King

I Have a Dream

I post on for the anniversary of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s famous I Have a Dream speech in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in August, 1963 an excerpt from a post by the Rev. Chuck  Queen of Frankfort, KY in his blog,  A Fresh Perspective,  of August 2013.

From the progressive point of view, the kingdom of God is as much about this life in this world as it is about the life and world to come. It’s about being in right relationship with God and everyone and everything else. Loving our neighbor as ourselves is just as important as loving God.

It’s about a world where everyone has enough – not just to survive, but to thrive and flourish.From the progressive point of view, the kingdom of God is as much about this life in this world as it is about the life and world to come. It’s about being in right relationship with God and everyone and everything else. Loving our neighbor as ourselves is just as important as loving God.It’s about a world where everyone has enough – not just to survive, but to thrive and flourish.

It’s about a world where the playing field is leveled, where the excluded are included, where all are treated with dignity, equality, and respect.

It’s about a world where poverty is eliminated and the oppressed are liberated and all that is broken is healed.

A progressive vision emphasizes inclusion, equality, compassion, social justice, and the dignity of all people.

(You can read the full post here.)

I Declare World Peace.

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The Jericho Road

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We are called to play the Good Samaritan on life’s roadside; but that will be only an initial act. One day the whole Jericho Road must be transformed so that men and women will not be beaten and robbed as they make their journey through life. True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it understands that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring.

From The World House, an essay by M.L. King, Jr.

See also the Gospel of Luke 10: 25-37 of the Christian Scriptures (New Testament).

The World House

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Some years ago a famous novelist died. Among his papers was found a list of suggested plots for future stories, the most prominently underscored being this one: “A widely separated family inherits a house in which they have to live together.” This is the great new problem of mankind. We have inherited a large house, a great “world house” in which we have to live together-black and white, Easterner and Westerner, Gentile and Jew, Catholic and Protestant, Moslem and Hindu-a family unduly separated in ideas, culture and interest, who, because we can never again live apart, must learn somehow to live with each other in peace.

So begins an essay, a chapter from the book ~ Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? by Martin Luther King, Jr. that was posted by the Fellowship of Reconciliation following the events of 9-11.

Summarizing the essay, the FOR wrote:

In “The World House,” Dr. King calls us to: 1) transcend tribe, race, class, nation, and religion to embrace the vision of a World House; 2) eradicate at home and globally the Triple Evils of racism, poverty, and militarism; 3) curb excessive materialism and shift from a “thing”-oriented society to a “people”-oriented society; and 4) resist social injustice and resolve conflicts in the spirit of love embodied in the philosophy and methods of nonviolence. He advocates a Marshall Plan to eradicate global poverty, a living wage, and a guaranteed minimum annual income for every American family. He urges the United Nations to experiment with the use of nonviolent direct action in international conflicts. The final paragraph warns of the “fierce urgency of now” and cautions that this may be the last chance to choose between chaos and community.

The FOR wrote that when Dr. King was addressing the conditions that breed Communism, we might today use the words, “terrorism” or “religious fanaticism.”  I would also venture to say that when Dr, King writes of  the racism of the former apartheid of South Africa that we today might think  of the new apartheid of the discrimination and oppression of the Palestinian people by the State of Israel. (See here and here.) I believe that, according to this essay, Dr. King would be a proponent of CODEPINK and its campaigns for freedom and human rights for Palestinians and to Bring Our War $$ Home .

Dr. King’s life and efforts may have come out of and be a part of Black History, but many of his words hold for today and can even point us to the future. Read the full introduction and complete essay here.

Along with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., I Declare World Peace.

“I mourn the lo…

“I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Returning hate for hate multiplies hate, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

Quoted from Brad Paulos:  Wise words from Martin Luther King Jr. that we should heed at this time…

The Network of Mutuality

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote in his 1963 Letter from a Birmingham Jail:

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

In a Q & A following her recent speech in Louisville, KY, Aung San Suu Kyi, Burmese democracy leader and Nobel Prize winner, said:

You must be able to put yourself in the place of your adversaries. What do you want done to you? What should they want done to themselves? … Non-violence is a good way of making yourself a better person.

In an interview with USA Today, regarding her new novel, The Casual Vacancy, J. K. Rowling said:

In some sense, the whole plot can be summed up with ‘What do we do about Krystal?’ and by extension, ‘What do we do about all those people who are in a poverty trap?’ But for Krystal, it’s more than that, isn’t it? Krystal is dealing with addiction in her family, she’s dealing with decades of increasing poverty in her family with everything that means, and she’s also caught in the crossfire of a local battle because this beautiful West Country town of Pagford is furious that it has jurisdiction over and responsibility for what we call a council estate (low-income public housing). So Krystal is caught up in this local battle, and of course in examining this tiny little local battle I get to explore what I think are fairly universal themes.

I do think the themes in the book do translate across any national border because ultimately we’re talking about our human responsibility, whether you think we should all be entirely self-reliant and people sink or swim, or you think we should be extending a helping hand and whether that should come from government and so on. And these are very contemporary themes in a lot of countries, particularly in the financial mess in which we find ourselves.

 

I Declare World Peace.